Civic Seminar Participants

Adam Bush College Unbound
Raul Cervantes College Visions
Lizzy Cooper Davis Harvard University
Gregg Grenier Bentley University
Beste Güçler UMASS Dartmouth
Lorlene Hoyt Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Matthew Ingram UMASS Dartmouth
Tricia Kress UMASS Boston
Nick Longo Providence College
Mike McCarthy College Unbound at Roger Williams University
Mel Netzhammer Keene State University
Margaret Post College of the Holy Cross
Douglas Owens UMASS Dartmouth
Matt Roy UMASS Dartmouth
Micah Salkind Brown University
John Saltmarsh UMASS Boston
Najah Shakir Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Linda Silka University of Maine
Michelle Sterk Barrett UMASS Boston
Susan Sturm
Columbia University
Ed Zlotkowski Bentley University

 

Adam Bush is the founding Director of Curriculum of College Unbound: a college degree program in Providence, RI working to contend with retention rates for first generation college students by equally incorporating voices outside of the academy in the teaching and evaluation of its student body in an outcomes-based program that values civic engagement, incorporates internship work, and productively integrates the epistemology of daily life.  Adam is also a Doctoral Candidate in the American Studies and Ethnicity department at USC working on his dissertation "Passing Notes in Class; Listening to Pedagogy and Improvisations in Jazz History," serves as the Director of Imagining America's Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) program, the chair of the K-16 Collaboration Committee of the American Studies Association, and is the board president of the Studio for Southern California History (www.socalstudio.org) in Los Angeles.

Raul Cervantes was born and raised in sunny California. He spent most of his life in Los Angeles before he moved to attend the University of California, Berkeley where he majored in architecture. Raul is proud to be the first member in his family to attend college. After graduating he moved back to Los Angeles to work at a charter school assisting other first-generation minority students receive their high school diploma. Last summer he adventurously moved across the country to Providence, Rhode Island to work with College Visions, a non-profit college access program that offers intensive college admissions advising and advocacy to low-income and first-generation college bound students. When Raul is not at work he loves watching foreign films, exploring new museums, and eating exotic foods.

Lizzy Cooper Davis is a doctoral candidate in African & African American Studies with a primary field in Anthropology. Her interests include the anthropology of race, black Atlantic performance and spiritual traditions, and the role of the arts in social movements. She has studied Afro-Cuban religion and performance in Havana and her current research explores intersections of artful community organizing and spiritual resistance in black New Orleans. She has trained at Duke's Center for Documentary Studies and with Augusto Boal in New York and Rio de Janeiro in his Freire-inspired Theater of the Oppressed. Her professional experience has included developing community partnerships and recording oral histories with StoryCorps, working as an artist-educator in schools, community centers, and prisons, and performing nationally as an actor. She currently serves as a panelist for the New York State Council on the Arts, works as a consultant on arts-based community organizing, education and leadership development with Culture for Change, The Young People’s Project and The Urban Bush Women and is the co-editor of the forthcoming volume Enacting Pleasure: Artists and Scholars Respond to Carol Gilligan's Map of Love (2010). Additionally, through Harvard’s Cultural Agents Initiative she conducts Forum Theater workshops with undergraduates to facilitate dialogue on diversity and conflict resolution and with the American Repertory Theater’s MFA students to introduce the methodologies of Boal's Theater of the Oppressed.

Gregg Grenier, a junior Marketing major at Bentley University, is part of the Service-Learning Center at Bentley. Within the Service-Learning Center at Bentley, Gregg has been a Project Manager of several programs, a Project Coordinator of a Web2.0 program that ran at two middle schools, a member of the Steering Committee, and just recently named as the Community Engagement Coordinator for next year. This new position is one of the three top student positions within the Service-Learning Center. Over the course of the last year, Gregg has been working alongside Dr. Edward Zlotkowski in continuing the civic engagement movement on Bentley’s campus and also around New England. Gregg has organized and facilitated three conferences over the course of the last year; a high school leadership conference for at-risk high school students in four surrounding communities, the first NERCHE student Think Tank, and a civic engagement forum for Bentley students and faculty. Gregg also recently attended the “Citizens’ Toolbox Conference” at Miami University of Ohio where he gave a presentation to students, faculty, and professionals on raising the level of institutional literacy among college students. Gregg and a fellow student will be completing their Honors Program Capstone Project in the fall on the topic of institutional literacy, with Dr. Zlotkowski as the academic advisor. Gregg is also interested in continuing his education after graduation by pursuing a master’s degree in higher education.

Beste Güçler is an assistant professor in the department of STEM Education at UMass Dartmouth. She holds a B.S. degree in Mathematics; a M.S. degree in Mathematics; and a M.S. degree in Secondary Mathematics Education. She received her Ph.D. in Mathematics Education with a cognate in Teacher Education in 2010 from Michigan State University. Dr. Güçler’s present work explores how mathematical discourse develops over history and in undergraduate calculus classes with a focus on the concept of limit. In particular, she investigates how the elements of instructors’ mathematical discourse compare and contrast with those of the students. Her general research interests include conceptual and historical development of mathematical concepts; the teaching and learning of calculus at the undergraduate level; and the connections between mathematics education and social justice issues (e.g. ability tracking, characteristics of remedial mathematics courses, students’ occupational decision-making based on their success in mathematics).

Lorlene Hoyt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2002, she founded MIT@Lawrence, a sustained city-campus partnership between M.I.T. and the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Her principal fields of interests are community economic development and social media. Dr. Hoyt’s research has been published in academic journals such as Planning and Design, the Journal of Planning Education and Research, Economic Affairs, the International Journal of Public Administration, Geography Compass, Cityscape, the Journal of Urban Technology, and the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning. With an educational background in Landscape Architecture and City Planning, she co-founded Urban Revitalizers, LLC, a women and minority-owned real estate development and urban planning consultancy in 1998. Before joining M.I.T., she supervised the crime analysis and mapping unit at the Philadelphia Police Department and worked as a senior planner for the Philadelphia Housing Authority.

Matthew Ingram is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at UMass Dartmouth. He studies justice reforms in Brazil and Mexico, and conducted two years of doctoral research in these countries with funding from the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Commission, and the Social Science Research Council. His interests in law and democracy stem, in part, from growing up in Mexico in the 1970s and early 1980s, and from seven years of work in law enforcement in California. He holds a BA from Pomona College, and both a law degree and a PhD from the University of New Mexico. Prior to coming to UMass Dartmouth, Matt was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for US-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego. Matt is originally from Mexico, and speak Spanish and Portuguese.

Tricia M. Kress, assistant professor (Ph.D. CUNY Graduate Center): Dr. Kress’s research focuses on using critical pedagogy and critical qualitative research to create democratic learning environments in which teachers and students learn with and from each other dialogically.  Her research is specifically urban and focuses on issues of equity and social justice. She is the author of Critical Praxis Research: Breathing New Life into Research Methods for Teachers (in press, Springer), and served as guest editor of, “Using Critical Research for Educational and Social Change” a special edition of The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education (forthcoming in 2011).   She is the lead editor of the book Challenging status Quo Retrenchment: New Directions in Critical Qualitative Research (forthcoming in 2012, Information Age Press), and “Under the Radar and Off the Grid”, a special edition of the International Journal of Critical Pedagogy.

Nicholas V. Longo is director of the Global Studies program and assistant professor of Public and Community Service Studies at Providence College. Previously, he was the founding director of the national student civic engagement campaign, Raise Your Voice, for Campus Compact from 2002-2004 and then director of the Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute at Miami University.  Nick is also the author of Why Community Matters: Connecting Education with Civic Life (SUNY Press, 2007) and co-editor of Students as Colleagues: Expanding the Circle of Service-Learning Leadership (Campus Compact: 2006).

Mike McCarthy, an undergraduate student at College Unbound @ Roger Williams University, is a 28-year-old veteran focusing on different opportunities. His overall interest is sailing and working with youth on hands-on experience. Mike is most interested in the social sciences and philosophy. He now sees any potential career as a vehicle for making solid connections and fostering lasting relationships with those around him.  His current work blends issues of access, inclusion, and diversity with mediums of technology and animation, to create new venues for discussing transformation in higher education.

Mel Netzhammer is Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs atKeene State College.  Prior to accepting that appointment in 2006, he was dean of the School of Arts and Humanities at Buffalo State College in Buffalo, New York.  His tenure at Buffalo State included 7 years as dean and 5 years as communication department chair. His academic background is in communication, where he studies popular culture and media effects. At Keene State, Dr. Netzhammer has led the curricular transformation that moved the college from a 3-credit model to a 4-credit model and included the implementation of the Integrative Studies Program, the College's LEAP exemplar general education program. He has established new partnerships with school districts in the Monadnock region, businesses and non-profit organizations, and with other colleges across New Hampshire. Dr. Netzhammer chairs the New England Higher Education Resource Center's Academic Affairs Think Tank and the Academic Affairs Committee of the New Hampshire College and University Council. He serves on the national steering committees of the American Democracy Project and the Red Balloon Project, two initiatives of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. He is president of the board of directors of Hannah Grimes Center in Keene, a business incubator. He holds doctoral and master's degrees from the University of Utah.

Douglas T. Owens is an Associate Professor of Music and Music Department Chair at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. His research emphasis is on music education, musicians’ health and music entrepreneurship. He earned the Doctor of Arts degree in Music with emphases in Music Education and Jazz Pedagogy at the University of Northern Colorado. Owens earned the Master of Music degree in trumpet performance and the Bachelor of Music Education degree at the University of Colorado, Boulder. An experienced music educator since 1986, Dr. Owens was most recently an Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Southern Maine. He has been a music educator at the elementary, middle, and high school levels in California and Wisconsin. Dr. Owens continues to serve as a guest conductor, clinician and adjudicator of wind ensembles, concert bands and jazz ensembles. Dr. Owens has presented research at the national meetings of the College Music Society, the Music Educators National Conference, the Eastern Division meetings of the Music Educators National Conference, the Maine Music Educators Association, the National Hearing Conservation Association, the Health Promotion in Schools of Music Conference, the Performing Arts Medicine Association National Symposium, the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, the Colorado Music Educators Association Conference and the University of Northern Colorado Research Conference. Dr. Owens has published nationally and internationally with research appearing in Medical Problems of Performing Artists, the National Band Association Journal and The Instrumentalist. He is the 2004 recipient of the Alice G. Brandfonbrener Young Investigator Award, presented by the Performing Arts Medicine Association for the paper Sound Pressure Levels Experienced by the High School Band Director. As the lead trumpet of the Portland (Maine) Jazz Orchestra, Dr. Owens has performed with Bob Mintzer, the New York Voices and Wayne Bergeron. Additionally, Dr. Owens is a member of the Chris Humphrey Big Band and the Thomas Snow Band. He is a former member of the Norumbega Brass.

Margaret A. Post is Director of the Donelan Office of Community-based Learning at the College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts).  Post holds a Doctorate in Social Policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, and a Master of Public Policy from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota.  For over ten years, she has worked as a community organizer, educator, and scholar. Her research interests include the role of grassroots organizations in social policy change and the civic development of young people and new immigrants.  In addition to teaching courses on organizing and public policy, Post regularly conducts trainings for a broad range of non-profit and political organizations.  In 2007, Post received the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities and the Bailis Family Social Justice Award from the Heller School at Brandeis University. She currently serves on the Advisory Boards of Massachusetts Campus Compact and the publication, Diversity and Democracy, and has been recognized by Campus Compact as an Engaged Scholar for New Perspectives in Higher Education.

Matthew H. Roy is Assistant Provost and Director of the Center for Civic Engagement at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  He is also a Professor of Management having received his Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from the University of Rhode Island.  His research interests are varied, but focus on international management, small group development, trust building, and communication strategies for organizational success.  He has published and/or presented over 100 refereed scholarly manuscripts.  He serves on the editorial board of several journals including the Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education and Benchmarking: An International Journal.  The recipient of the University of Massachusetts President's Award for Public Service in 2009 and the UMass Dartmouth Teacher of the Year award in 2008 are testimonies to his commitment to teaching, research, and public service. Professor Roy is leading a five campus collaboration to increase the breadth and depth of community service learning performed by University of Massachusetts students.   He is also the architect of the Leadership for Educational Attainment Developed through Service (LEADS) program, designed to increase the civic engagement and leadership skills of Fall River and New Bedford public school students.  Dr. Roy's efforts have resulted in UMass Dartmouth’s receiving recognition from the Carnegie Foundation and the President's Higher Education Honor Roll.

Micah Salkind is a Providence Rhode Island-based writer, curator, DJ and sound designer. Salkind is pursuing a PhD in American Civilization at Brown University. His research interests include Afro-Diasporic cultural production and arts policy as it relates to neighborhood and economic development.

John Saltmarsh is the Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education at the University of Massachusetts, Boston as well as a faculty member in the Department of Leadership in Education in the Graduate College of Education. From 1998 through 2005, he directed the Project on Integrating Service with Academic Study at Campus Compact. He holds a Ph.D. in American History from Boston University and taught for over a decade at Northeastern University and as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Feinstein Institute for Public Service at Providence College. He is the author of numerous book chapters and articles on civic engagement, service-learning, and experiential education. His writings have appeared in Liberal Education, the Michigan Journal for Community Service Learning, Academe: The Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors, the Journal of Experiential Education, the National Society for Experiential Education Quarterly and the Journal of Cooperative Education. He has served as the guest editor for a special issue on service-learning and civic engagement of the Journal of Public Affairs and serves on the editorial board of the Michigan Journal of Community Service-Learning and the board of the AACU Center for Liberal Education and Civic Engagement.

Najah Shakir is a junior in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She focuses on community and economic development. In the fall of 2010 she worked with Professor Lorlene Hoyt in the MIT@Lawrence practicum.

Linda Silka directs the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center at the University of Maine and is a Professor in the School of Economics there.  For three decades she was a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Lowell where she directed the Center for Family, Work, and Community.  Most of Dr. Silka’s work has focused on community-university partnerships and how they can be strengthened.  Her work in this area has included partnerships on education, housing, health, environmental issues, sustainability, and immigrant and refugee experiences.  This work has been funded by NIH, NSF, EPA, HUD, and the U. S. Dept of Education.

Michelle Sterk Barrett is a doctoral student in the higher education administration program at UMASS Boston. As a graduate research assistant, she is working with the Getting Past Go initiative to investigate state policies pertaining to remedial and developmental education in an effort to increase college attainment rates. Michelle spent a decade working in service learning and community engagement at Simmons College’s Scott/Ross Center for Community Service and Boston College’s PULSE Program. Prior to that, Michelle worked in college admissions and counseling for City Year, Regis College, and Pine Manor College. Michelle holds a Master’s degree in Higher Education Administration from Boston College and a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Villanova University. She is assisting NERCHE with coordinating the regional “civic seminar” during the spring 2011 semester.

Susan Sturm is the George M. Jaffin Professor of Law and Social Responsibility and the founding director of the Center for Institutional and Social Change at Columbia Law School. She has published numerous articles, case studies and books on “the architecture of inclusion,” institutional change, transformative leadership, workplace equality, legal education, and inclusion and diversity in higher education. Her recent publications include: Scaling Up (2010); Negotiating Workplace Equality (2008); Conflict Resolution and Systemic Change (with Howard Gadlin, 2007); The Architecture of Inclusion: Advancing Workplace Equity in Higher Education (2006); Law’s Role in Addressing Complex Discrimination (2005); Equality and the Forms of Justice (2004); Lawyers and the Practice of Workplace Equity (2002); Second Generation Employment Discrimination: A Structural Approach, (2001); and Who’s Qualified? (with Lani Guinier, 2001). “The Architecture of Inclusion” was the focus of a symposium issue published in the June 2007 issue of the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender. Sturm is the principal investigator for a Ford Foundation grant awarded to develop the architecture of inclusion in higher education. She has worked with numerous research and educational organizations and networks seeking to build the knowledge and capacity needed to advance full participation and exercise leadership in addressing important problems. She is currently co-chairing a working group on Transformative Leadership, as part of a Ford Foundation funded project on Building Knowledge for Social Justice. Her research on strategies for facilitating constructive multi-racial interaction in police training is featured on the Racetalks website, www.racetalks.org. Professor Sturm was one of the architects of the national conference on The Future of Diversity and Opportunity in Higher Education. In 2007, she received the Presidential Teaching Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia.

Edward Zlotkowski is a professor of English at Bentley College and in 1990 founded the Bentley Service-Learning Center, an institution-wide program that has involved all of the college's undergraduate academic departments, more than a quarter of its full-time faculty, and several thousand students. He writes and speaks extensively on a wide range of service-learning and engagement-related topics, and served as general editor of the American Association for Higher Education's 21-volume series on service-learning in the academic disciplines. He also served as editor of Successful Service-Learning Programs, published by Anker in 1998, Service-Learning and the First-Year Experience, published by the University of South Carolina in 2002, and as co-editor of Students as Colleagues: Expanding the Circle of Service-Learning Leadership, published by Campus Compact in 2006. Dr. Zlotkowski has led service-learning workshops for international, national, and regional organizations as well as several hundred individual campuses. His non-service learning scholarly interests have included contemporary American poetry, and German and English romanticism. He regularly uses service-learning in his own teaching.

Susan Sturm is the George M. Jaffin Professor of Law and Social Responsibility and the founding director of the Center for Institutional and Social Change at Columbia Law School. She has published numerous articles, case studies and books on “the architecture of inclusion,” institutional change, transformative leadership, workplace equality, legal education, and inclusion and diversity in higher education. Her recent publications include: Scaling Up (2010); Negotiating Workplace Equality (2008); Conflict Resolution and Systemic Change (with Howard Gadlin, 2007); The Architecture of Inclusion: Advancing Workplace Equity in Higher Education (2006); Law’s Role in Addressing Complex Discrimination (2005); Equality and the Forms of Justice (2004); Lawyers and the Practice of Workplace Equity (2002); Second Generation Employment Discrimination: A Structural Approach, (2001); and Who’s Qualified? (with Lani Guinier, 2001). “The Architecture of Inclusion” was the focus of a symposium issue published in the June 2007 issue of the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender. Sturm is the principal investigator for a Ford Foundation grant awarded to develop the architecture of inclusion in higher education. She has worked with numerous research and educational organizations and networks seeking to build the knowledge and capacity needed to advance full participation and exercise leadership in addressing important problems. She is currently co-chairing a working group on Transformative Leadership, as part of a Ford Foundation funded project on Building Knowledge for Social Justice. Her research on strategies for facilitating constructive multi-racial interaction in police training is featured on the Racetalks website, www.racetalks.org. Professor Sturm was one of the architects of the national conference on The Future of Diversity and Opportunity in Higher Education. In 2007, she received the Presidential Teaching Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia.